Green Iguana Society logo  1999-2001, D. Baze



This page describes various parts of an iguana's anatomy. The first photo here defines various parts of the head and upper body.



These two photos show that iguanas do have many very sharp teeth. These photos are provided to not only show you what iguana teeth look like, but to serve as a warning when dealing with large, aggressive iguanas. Iguanas have many very sharp, jagged and dangerous teeth that are very capable of shredding leafy foods, as well as human skin! The photo on the right is also an excellent view of an iguana's tongue.



The photo below shows the parietal eye. The parietal eye is a tiny, transparent scale on the top of the head that detects light and dark. Iguanas use the parietal eye to alert them to aerial predators. It is sometimes referred to as the third-eye.



The photos below show the femoral pores of a male iguana (Jake). The photo on the left was taken when Jake was not in breeding season. Notice his large, easily visible femoral pores. The photo on the right was taken during breeding season. Notice the large waxy plugs protruding from the femoral pores.



The photos below show the femoral pores of two different female iguanas. The photo on the left (Donnie) shows her small femoral pores. The photo on the right (Vega$) shows a close-up view of the waxy plugs within her femoral pores.



The following photo shows a male iguana (Bumpy) with everted hemipenes. This photo was taken during breeding season following a mating session. Males will evert their hemipenes for breeding, occasionally during defecation, and sometimes just to "show off" to people or other iguanas during breeding season. If the hemipenes are prolapsed (protruding for an extended amount of time), immediate veterinary treatment is advised. This photo also shows the waxy plugs protruding from the femoral pores, which is a good indication that the iguana is in breeding season.









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